Dating after filing for divorce in tennessee


The clerk's office will keep the parties and the lawyers informed throughout the process in regards to additional paperwork that is needed, further requirements, and hearing dates and times.Since Tennessee is an "equitable distribution" state, the marital property shall be divided in an equitable fashion.Fault: (1) impotence; (2) adultery; (3) conviction of a felony and imprisonment; (4) alcoholism and/or drug addiction; (5) wife is pregnant by another at the time of marriage without husband's knowledge; (6) willful desertion for 1 year; (7) bigamy; (8) endangering the life of the spouse; (9) conviction of an infamous crime; (10) refusing to move to Tennessee with a spouse and willfully absenting oneself from a new residence for 2 years; (11) cruel and inhuman treatment or unsafe and improper marital conduct; (12) indignities that make the spouse's life intolerable; and (13) abandonment, neglect, or banning the spouse from the home.(Tennessee Code - Volume 6A, Title 36, Sections 36-4-101 and 36-4-103) In the __________ Court of __________ County, Tennessee.Tennessee Divorce Start Your Divorce Find Professionals Tennessee Articles Divorce Facts Divorce Grounds Residency Divorce Laws Mediation/Counseling Divorce Process Legal Separation Annulments Property Division Alimony Child Custody Child Support Divorce Forms Process Service Grandparent Rights Forum Tennessee Products Divorce by County Welcome About Us 100% Guarantees Central Log in Contact Us Find Professionals Start Your Divorce States Categories Forms Divorce Laws Articles Forums Blogs Encyclopedia Checklists Tools Bookstore For Professionals Tennessee Divorce Start Your Divorce Find Professionals Tennessee Articles Divorce Facts Divorce Grounds Residency Divorce Laws Mediation/Counseling Divorce Process Legal Separation Annulments Property Division Alimony Child Custody Child Support Divorce Forms Process Service Grandparent Rights Forum Tennessee Products Divorce by County In order to file for a divorce in Tennessee, residency requirements must be met for the court to accept the case.If the court discovers it does not have jurisdictional rights to hear the case it will not be accepted or it will eventually be dismissed.



The divorce grounds are as follows: A divorce will be granted by the Tennessee court upon the following grounds: No-Fault: (1) irreconcilable differences if: [a] there has been no denial of this ground; [b] the spouses submit a properly signed marital dissolution agreement (see below under Simplified or Special Divorce Procedures); or [c] this grounds for divorce is combined with a general fault-based grounds or (2) living separate and apart without cohabitation for 2 years when there are no minor children.The court may also require a that one parent be responsible for carrying health insurance coverage for the child as well as having the paying parent have a life insurance policy naming the child as a beneficiary should he she pre-decease the emancipation of the child.(Tennessee Code - Volume 6A, Title 36, Sections 36-4-101 and 36-4-501) Copyright Notice: The above synopsis of Tennessee divorce laws is original material which is owned and copyrighted by Divorce Source, Inc.This material has been adapted from applicable state laws and unauthorized reproduction is prohibited.The court will consider the following factors: (1) the love, affection, and emotional ties between the parents and child; (2) the importance of continuity and the length of time the child has lived in a stable and satisfactory environment; (3) whether there has been any domestic violence or physical or mental abuse to the child, spouse, or any other person and whether a parent has had to relocate to avoid such violence; (4) the stability of the family unit; (5) the mental and physical health of the parents; (6) the home, school, and community record of the child; (7) the reasonable preference of a child over 12 years of age; (8) the character and behavior of any person who lives in or visits the parent's home and such person's interactions with the child; and (9) each parent's past and potential performance of parenting duties, including a willingness and ability to facilitate and encourage a close and continuing parent-child relationship with the other parent.